If a black woman and a white woman both need emergency obstetric care, a Brazilian doctor will assist the white woman because of the stereotype that black women are better at handling pain and are used to giving birth.

IPS – Brazil study: Racism Is Bad for Health | Inter Press Service

Read the rest of the study at the link, with details on how this racism in healthcare plays out.

Recently a powerful tool for analysis—really a breakthrough, in my opinion—came in the form of a sociological study, “The impact of light skin on prison time for black female offenders.” I suspect that because it’s academic—you have to buy it to read the whole thing—and because it’s wonky as hell, this Villanova University study didn’t receive a quarter of the attention idiotic party promoters, tweeps and rappers like Yung “Dark Butts” Berg do when they floss their color bias.

But the key finding in this study of more than 12,000 black women imprisoned in North Carolina between 1995 and 2009 is that those who were classified as light skinned by one or more corrections officers during intake served 12 percent less time than dark skinned prisoners. Along with height, weight, build, hair and eye color, there’s literally a color code—0 for non-light skin and 1 for light skin. (And lest you think light-skinned women prisoners in the study committed less serious crimes than their dark-skinned sistren, the study controlled for crucial factors including type of arrest, previous record, recidivism and prison behavioral record.)

garlandgrey-deactivated20120712

So I was censored by the tumblr staff?

sapphrikah:

This is disturbing as all fuck to me.

Yesterday, if you guys were on, I reblogged a post from brownroundboi of a pictures of a white girl from Ireland “dressed up” as Lafayette from True Blood complete with full blackface. The caption I added said something like “File under: clues that you’re a racist fuck.” Several others reblogged it as well in disgust of course.

I then reblogged something from the same girl of a piece of kitchen “artwork” that looked quite minstrel-esque to me too. Which is miraculously still up on my blog. So then she came to me with a slightly-lengthy message about how she’s not racist, she loves Lafayette, she felt like we were being hateful and that was our faults, and even asked me if she wore her Lionel Richie shirt would that mean she was “making fun” of him too?

I was so civil to her, for the fact that she reached out. Of course I told her how wrong she is, and I told her why as well. But I actually even commended her for coming forward. I answered her privately so that her message would get to her for sure, and then posted a completely independent text post of the exchange for my followers to see. Today, all of the posts, including her original and all of our reblogs, PLUS the stand-alone version of the question she asked me, have been deleted. That means someone had to actually GO THROUGH my blog and select that stand-alone post and remove it.

The only thing I can think is that she claimed harassment. Which is ridiculous. Her blackface was harassing to the black race. But if we call out one little white girl all of the important constructive things we say get fucking deleted?! That’s gotdamn scary if you ask me. I don’t even know what to say, tumblr staff. Seriously, why is she being protected? This is just freakin’ scary.

I doubt there is anyone who hasn’t seen this by now, but just in case, I’m going to leave it right here.

Fatphobia turned into an artform

via The Sidney Morning Herald, some pearls of wisdom from Lyndon Terracini, the artistic director of Opera Australia, who next month unveils the program for his first season:

The fat lady has sung. And if Lyndon Terracini continues to get his way, she won’t get an encore until she at least shifts some weight.

Lest the man charged with overseeing the future of opera in Australia be accused of sexism, he is quick to point out that his shape-up-or-ship-out message applies to all performers, regardless of gender.

”If you’re seeing a couple making out and one of them is obese, who wants to watch that?” he says with a theatrical grimace. ”It’s obscene. You just think, ‘Jeez, for Chrissakes, don’t let the children see that’.”

and this:

If casting ”triple threats” who can sing, act and look good helps spark an interest among people who think opera is only for the old and rich, then he makes no apologies for upping the unemployment rate of overweight singers.

”You go to a movie and you see people who look exactly right for that role,” he says. ”They’re consummate actors and they’re completely involved in what they are doing, so their performance is totally believable.

Bad Pun Day: Apparently, Bayer Pharmaceuticals is toxic for women

More women suing Bayer unit

A class action suit alleging that Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals discriminated against women employees has been expanded to include female pharmaceutical sales representatives and all women in Bayer HealthCare’s Consumer Care unit — groups who weren’t originally included in a gender bias complaint filed earlier this year against the drug giant.

In an amended complaint filed Wednesday in federal court in New Jersey, lawyers for the women said the sales representatives were paid less and not promoted as often as male peers while the women in the consumer care division were sexually harassed by Bayer executives and the company ignored their requests for help.

And there’s this:

In the amended complaint, Natalie Celske, a senior sales consultant, said that in 2009 she was replaced in a district trainer position based in Boise, Idaho, by a male colleague who had lower sales results and lower overall performance. When she asked a manager why, he replied that the male candidate was “more into [the man’s] career path, not yours.”

As if discrimination for promotions weren’t bad enough, we hit the double whammy with, what else, dismissed complains about sexual harassment:

Ms. Santangelo alleged a senior attorney for Bayer HealthCare repeatedly made comments about her body and her attire and once made an inappropriate comment to her during an elevator ride.[…]

When the harassment did not stop, according to the complaint, she confided in her manager who “dismissed or diminished her concerns and … made it seem like the sexual harassment she was experiencing was her fault or her problem.”


A toy shop in Almelo has been criticised by the equal opportunities commission for refusing to give any more work to a shop assistant who wears an Islamic headscarf.

The commission said the shop is discriminating against the teenager on religious grounds.

The girl had worked at the shop wearing a headscarf but was asked to remove it after a customer refused to be served by her, the Telegraaf reports.

The shop says the girl was asked not ordered to remove the scarf but was taken off the roster because of the ‘angry and intimidating’ way she reacted.

DutchNews.nl

What kind of person refuses to be served (and let it be known that I hate that word and it does have implications in this context) by a teenager wearing a headscarf?

And also, what kind of manager considers the “feelings” of such person to be more important than the feelings of the girl at the receiving end of the discrimination?

In Texas, a man is serving 35 years in prison for spitting at a police officer. In the state of Washington, a 19-year-old college student sits behind bars on first-degree assault charges for having unprotected sex with his girlfriend. A Georgia woman was sentenced to eight years in prison after consensual sex without a condom, while a Michigan man faced 10 years in prison on a felony charge for allegedly biting his neighbor during a scuffle. The penalties are steep because, according to the laws in these states, the defendants all brandished a deadly weapon: their HIV-positive status.

Such prosecutions are frequent. Thirty-four states have some type of HIV-criminalization law. Depending on the state, it may be illegal to expose someone else to HIV, transmit the virus or conceal your own HIV-positive status from potential sexual partners. This criminalization extends even to cases in which condoms were used or when the virus was not transmitted, as well as to acts, such as spitting or biting, that pose minuscule to no risk.

HIV Status: Prosecuting a Virus

Also from the article:

Pushing back against what they see as a cycle of stigma, shame and incarceration, a growing coalition of organizations, including the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation and the Center for HIV Law and Policy, are framing the criminalization of HIV as a civil rights struggle. “This is a targeting of people, based on a stigma against groups that are associated with HIV,” Catherine Hanssens, director of the Center for HIV Law and Policy, told The Root. “And that’s gay people and people of color.”[…]

Rather than a malicious intent to spread disease, activists say that there are many reasons some people keep quiet about their HIV status. The misinformed belief that HIV-positive people are highly toxic, for example, fuels not only social exclusion and familial rejection but has also led to discrimination in employment, housing and child-custody battles. In the military, where it’s illegal for HIV-positive people to have sex, dismissal can mean the loss of benefits.

Gawker Media can now add transphobia to its long list of achievements.
As seen here. And reproduced by Jezebel on their front page without changing a coma in the statement.
"It wasn’t just women" followed by the assertion that "two transwomen contacted you". What are those women? Koi fish, maybe? Way to contribute to the oppression of trans* people, Gawker Media,  portraying their lives as "not the real thing, you know", or as  "imitations of". You stay classy, guys.

Gawker Media can now add transphobia to its long list of achievements.

As seen here. And reproduced by Jezebel on their front page without changing a coma in the statement.

"It wasn’t just women" followed by the assertion that "two transwomen contacted you". What are those women? Koi fish, maybe? Way to contribute to the oppression of trans* people, Gawker Media, portraying their lives as "not the real thing, you know", or as "imitations of". You stay classy, guys.

The theme for Human Rights Day 10 December 2010 is human rights defenders who act to end discrimination.
Human rights defenders acting against discrimination, often at great  personal risk to both themselves and their families, are being  recognized and acclaimed on this day.
Human rights defenders speak out against abuse and violations  including discrimination, exclusion, oppression and violence.  They  advocate justice and seek to protect the victims of human rights  violations.  They demand accountability for perpetrators and  transparency in government action.  In so doing, they are often putting  at risk their own safety, and that of their families.
Some human rights defenders are famous, but most are not. They are  active in every part of the world, working alone and in groups, in local  communities, in national politics and internationally.
Human Rights Day 2010 will highlight and promote the achievements of  human rights defenders and it will again emphasize the primary  responsibility Governments have to enable and protect their role. The  Day is also intended to inspire a new generation of defenders to speak  up and take action to end discrimination in all of its forms whenever  and wherever it is manifested.
The story does not end after 10 December 2010.  The focus on the work  of human rights defenders will continue through all of 2011.
via United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights.

The theme for Human Rights Day 10 December 2010 is human rights defenders who act to end discrimination.

Human rights defenders acting against discrimination, often at great personal risk to both themselves and their families, are being recognized and acclaimed on this day.

Human rights defenders speak out against abuse and violations including discrimination, exclusion, oppression and violence.  They advocate justice and seek to protect the victims of human rights violations.  They demand accountability for perpetrators and transparency in government action.  In so doing, they are often putting at risk their own safety, and that of their families.

Some human rights defenders are famous, but most are not. They are active in every part of the world, working alone and in groups, in local communities, in national politics and internationally.

Human Rights Day 2010 will highlight and promote the achievements of human rights defenders and it will again emphasize the primary responsibility Governments have to enable and protect their role. The Day is also intended to inspire a new generation of defenders to speak up and take action to end discrimination in all of its forms whenever and wherever it is manifested.

The story does not end after 10 December 2010.  The focus on the work of human rights defenders will continue through all of 2011.

via United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights.

About sex work

I wanted to clarify a point (not because anyone asked but because I realized I never said this before) regarding the last post on sex workers rights. I do not speak on behalf of sex workers. I am not some “representative of sex workers rights" or any such thing. Simply because I am not one and as such, I am not qualified to represent their voices. The most valid voices to hear in the debate are the voices of sex workers themselves.

However, because I am active in the sociopolitical arena, because I am active in certain social programs and actions I do speak against groups that seek to marginalize sex workers. Particularly when those groups supposedly have my best interest in mind while doing so. Because such groups seek legitimization by actively trying to recruit women like me for their cause it is that I feel obliged to speak my mind. At least it will be known that when they say they have women’s rights in mind, they are not speaking on my behalf.

Employers prefer native Dutch workers ‘to avoid problems’

Employers prefer native Dutch workers ‘to avoid problems’

Employers are more likely to choose an ethnic Dutch worker over someone with a minority background because they believe they are the safest choice and less likely to cause problems, the government’s socio-cultural planning office SCP says in a new report.

By giving a job to a native Dutch person, ‘they think they are less likely to be confronted with unexpected problems such as language difficulties and long holidays,’ the SCP says in its latest Discrimination Monitor, published on Tuesday.

In addition, employers sometimes exclude ethnic minority staff because they could dominate the workforce or cause divisions between other groups, the report says.

[…]

Earlier research has shown non-western immigrants in the Netherlands are more likely to be unemployed than the native Dutch and are less likely to have a permanent job, even if they have the same education, qualifications and experience.

Something not mentioned in the report above but that I see day after day: the requirement that candidates speak Dutch “without an accent”, meaning, Dutch that doesn’t sound foreign. A candidate might speak the language flawlessly, but if they have an accent that clearly identifies them as non Dutch, employers won’t give them a job, even if the position does not involve phone support or a customer facing function.

Anti-leprosy laws must be repealed, say UN human rights experts

Anti-leprosy laws must be repealed, say UN human rights experts

13 August 2010 – United Nations independent human rights experts have urged  the repeal of all laws discriminating against people affected by leprosy, which has been eliminated as a public health problem in most countries but still carries a strong social stigma.

The Human Rights Council Advisory Committee, composed of 18 independent experts serving as a think tank for the Council, have drafted a set of principles and guidelines also recommending that States enact laws to ensure that those affected by leprosy and their family members do not suffer discrimination in employment, health, marriage, and the use of public utilities and places.

The disease, one of the oldest known to mankind, is curable if diagnosed in time and disabilities caused by it can be prevented.

However, historically, people with the condition and their families have been despised and abandoned.

“Only after the elimination of social discrimination can the international community say that leprosy has truly vanished,” said Advisory Committee member Shigeki Sakamoto.
Those who have the disease and their families have been systematically isolated for years by States and communities which believe leprosy can spread and are afraid of the deformities it could cause.

The UN World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that in just a quarter century, more than 15 million cases of leprosy – which affects the poorest and most disadvantaged members of society – have been cured.

But despite this extraordinary progress, thousands of people still suffer from the neglected disease, and in many places, they still suffer discrimination.

But the full truth is that racism is alive and well in Mexico. It is primarily directed at indigenous communities who account for as many as 11.3 million people, or roughly 10% of the national population. The indigenous remain disproportionately mired in poverty and denied work, political access, education and other rights.

Racism in Mexico rears its ugly head - latimes.com

This (and it cannot be stated strongly enough) is the reality of Latin America from Mexico all the way down to Patagonia. Racism against indigenous people is rampant and institutionalized, and it amounts to the biggest “hidden” inequalities I have ever seen. Why “hidden”? Because they are hardly ever acknowledge by the state, because they are so widespread that they are naturalized and the extent of the oppression remains hidden from foreign eyes for the most part.